Inner Tongue’s music is soon to taste delicious on the edge of your own.

With music as weightless as a feather, and as fluttering too, each track of his is a delicate journey. Latest single, ‘Dig Deeper’, is a soft ode to freefalling. A dreamy number that doesn’t sacrifice on depth, it’s soul-baring but cool in its own rights.

Every starry beat feels calculated, every poetic word said carefully with thought. It’s testament to his musical journey, touched by real life and moments of ethereal happiness and inner struggles. Inner Tongue lets us in on his ride; the highs and lows that shape his beautiful sound.

This is the journey of Inner Tongue, so far…

“I grew up in a small village encapsulated by mountains. From 3 onwards I could mumble most The Cure and Pink Floyd songs as my parents were big fans. At 6, I was obsessed with The Cure ‘Live in Orange’ and watched it on VHS almost every day before joining the kids play outside.”

“I had a computer and microphone to record with quite early on in my life.”

“I kept writing and recording songs for years until my vocal chords stopped responding properly. I was diagnosed with a vocal lips disorder that needed operation in order to be able to talk again. The leading professional on European mainland promised to get me back on stage if I’d follow a 6-9 months long recovery procedure after an initial operation. So I borrowed a lot of money from relatives to afford it and went ahead.”

“For the next few weeks I had to remain completely silent. Unsure if I will ever sing again, I was reflecting on my musical career. At some point I had started to have expectations instead of visions as some kind of pop devil crept into the music. Potential success at an early age can mess with your focus. And it did with mine. I needed to gain back my naivety. I never actually wanted to take part in that success driven pop mentality and decided to do a full reset.”

“While not being able to talk and sing, I wrote a few instrumental pieces. I felt really high having created something that was deeply personal and mine again. After months of rehab, I recorded a few vocal takes to these songs and grew sure that I wanted to track them with a band.

“I called up my best friends and asked if they’d join me for a week long intense rehearsal session and then a week of recording. Nobody really knew what they were getting into, but still agreed to take part. We recorded six songs and after flying over to New York and London to mix them with Matt Boynton and John Catlin respectively, we decided to only release the London sessions, as the three songs done there were more intimate. The photo above is from the backyard of the rehearsal room from our first get together.”

“Upon releasing the EP, three of my favourite artists asked us to support them on their tours. It was Everything Everything, Ghostpoet and Get Well Soon.

A short discourse:

When I was slowly regaining consciousness after the operation, my mum and the doctor both told me repeatedly not to say anything and handed me a paper and pen to communicate with. Still somewhat dizzy, I started writing something down which my mum tried to decipher. From line to line it became more readable. I woke up hearing the same song playing in my head that I lost my consciousness to, and noted down the lyrics of it. The song was “Qwerty Fingers” by Everything Everything.”

“After these tours, I started to work on my debut album and still am. Most of the time I write at home. Whenever I can, I spend studio time with Flo, Philipp and John, trying to get high and lucky by experimentation. We are a bunch of people talking about music and engineering on a daily basis. Everyone writes their own stuff, gives each other comments or lends a hand. It’s lovely. Actually, I’m writing down these words while ProTools is freezing some parts of the intro track of the album. I’ll continue with that in a few minutes.

Speak soon,

Inner Tongue”